How freely do women and men communicate publicly in muslim communities essay

While created in the image of God with equality of worth and value, men and women are different by design and function. Gender differences are apparent physically and behaviorally. Men and women differ in the way they think, feel, act, and talk. In fact, one of the most striking differences between the sexes is the unique ways that men and women communicate.

How freely do women and men communicate publicly in muslim communities essay

And that "accosting a female stranger to interview her is a shocking breach of protocol In the Muslim world in some areas it is reinforced by the belief that the honor of the family resides in the conduct of its women.

On Muslim women and the Islamic dress code

Honor depends on a woman remaining chaste; should she be violated in any way, the men of the family risk being seen as weak and perhaps even being ostracized. Thus, in order to be respected by men, and protected from them, in public a woman should not flout her looks.

Of equal importance is the stated Qu'ranic principle which requires women to dress modestly in public. Although definitions of what this entails vary regionally, many Muslim women cover themselves to some extent in deference to their religion.

Women activists in the Muslim world are less preoccupied with what women wear than with securing other freedoms such as access to education, better health care for their families, or wider opportunities for work.

Commonly they argue for women's rights under the supposition of a culture-specific struggle, focusing on the implementation and activation of human rights claimed to be granted by Islam.

Feminist consciousness and action may indeed exist in greater measure with the wearer of Islamic dress than with one who wears up-to-date Western style clothes!

Rather than offering unasked for advice, non-Muslims might educate themselves with regard to local customs and religious belief, and offer support when it is requested by people within the culture itself. Following is an excerpted essay from a section in the curriculum unit Women in the Muslim World.

The essay provides an historical look at Islamic dress. The section contains primary source accounts on the topic from a variety of times and places. It is more common to see women in hijab, loose clothing topped by a type of scarf worn around the head and under the chin.

The Role of Women in Islam

Women don't share a common style nor have the same reasons for wearing hijab. For many it reflects the belief that they are following God's commandments, are dressing according to "the correct standard of modesty," or simply are wearing the type of traditional clothes they feel comfortable in.

How freely do women and men communicate publicly in muslim communities essay

A Complex History What constitutes modest clothing has changed over time. Like most customs, what women wear has reflected the practices of a region and the social position of the wearer.

The veil itself predates Islam by many centuries. In the Near East, Assyrian kings first introduced both the seclusion of women in the royal harem and the veil.

Prostitutes and slaves, however, were told not to veil, and were slashed if they disobeyed this law. Beyond the Near East, the practice of hiding one's face and largely living in seclusion appeared in classical Greece, in the Byzantine Christian world, in Persia, and in India among upper caste Rajput women.

Muslims in their first century at first were relaxed about female dress. When the son of a prominent companion of the Prophet asked his wife Aisha bint Talha to veil her face, she answered, "Since the Almighty hath put on me the stamp of beauty, it is my wish that the public should view the beauty and thereby recognized His grace unto them.

On no account, therefore, will I veil myself. Yet it was only in the second Islamic century that the veil became common, first used among the powerful and rich as a status symbol.

The Qu'ramic prescription to "draw their veils over their bosoms" became interpreted by some as an injunction to veil one's hair, neck and ears.

Throughout Islamic history only a part of the urban classes were veiled and secluded. Rural and nomadic women, the majority of the population, were not. For a woman to assume a protective veil and stay primarily within the house was a sign that her family had the means to enable her to do so.

Women In The Muslim World- Sample Essay (Women in World History Curriculum)

Since nomad women rarely veiled, in the early stages of those Islamic countries with nomadic roots, women often were allowed to go unveiled, even in town. In the years of the early Safavid dynasty, women were unveiled, although the custom was changed by late Safavid times.

Among the Turks, who came into Anatolia as nomads, Ibn Battuta in the fourteenth century saw what he called a "remarkable thing. The Turkish women do not veil themselves.Implicit in these verses is the expectation that men and women will be interacting.

Muslims are instructed to do so in such a way as to focus on attributes other than the physical, namely the spiritual and intellectual. The Prophet's first wife, Khadija, was a well known businesswoman in Mecca. In general, Muslim communities are poorer than the overall population.

In , Muslim men had an unemployment rate of 13 per cent across Britain, compared with an . Islam enjoins modest dress for both men and women, and in a Muslim society, the men as well as the women typically dress conservatively. The Qur'an tells them to dress modestly and cover their hair in all public situations, others insist that their whole body including hands and face are to be covered, yet others understand the guidance to mean a more general attitude of modesty both in dress and attitude.

ANTHZ Jesse Dizard April 10, Difference between Muslim and Non-Muslim Communities Nowadays, even though Islam is the second largest religion in the world, many people are still unfamiliar with Islam culture and consider that Muslim communities are extremely different from their communities.

Women covered in head scarves and chadors, Islamic divorce rules favoring men, the view that women should be relegated to the private rather than public sphere--these attitudes and practices. After which general commands are given equally to both men and women.

The Muslim men and Muslim women, the believing men and believing women, obedient men and obedient women, the truthful men and humble women, the charitable men and charitable women, the fasting men and fasting women, the men who guard their private parts and the women who do so, and the men who remember Allah often .

Global Connections . Roles of Women | PBS